If you shut up truth and bury it under the ground, it will but grow, and gather to itself such explosive power that the day it bursts through it will blow up everything in its way.
EMILE ZOLA

Ten years too late, it’s good riddance to wind farms – one of the most dangerous delusions of our age

Christopher Booker UK

"I have been following this (wind turbine) extraordinary story for ten years ever since, in 2002, I first began looking carefully at what really lay behind this deceptive obsession with the charms of wind power. It didn’t take me long, talking to experts and reading up on the technical facts, to see that the fashionable enthusiasm for wind energy was based on a colossal illusion. I first warned about what I called ‘the greatest mistake in our history’ in an article in the Mail almost ten years ago.
I described the claim that it would be the answer to all our future energy problems as a catastrophic failure of judgment. I feared that windpower was stupendously inefficient and ludicrously expensive and that by falling for the greatest energy hoax of our time, the Labour government could be consigning Britain to a very dark future. So unreliable are wind turbines — thanks to the wind’s constant vagaries — that they are one of the most inefficient means of producing electricity ever devised."


"The erection of a wind turbine creates apprehension in the general public, which makes the property less desirable and thus diminishes the prices of neighbouring property...” “Continuing scientific uncertainty over the adverse health consequences of wind turbines only serves to perpetuate the debilitating effect of wind turbines on property prices.”
Ben Lansink, Appraiser

Listen to internet radio with Wind Wise Radio on Blog Talk Radio

Sunday Herald, 04 Nov 12

Colin Donald
Business Editor, Sunday Herald

http://www.heraldscotland.com/business/company-news/tourism-will-pay-the-price-if-views-not-protected.19318478

Failure to value the A68 “Carter Bar Panorama”, often seen as the most spectacular scenic gateway to Scotland, is resulting in a “major missed marketing opportunity” according to a new survey by the Association for the Protection of Rural Scotland.

Claiming to be the first survey of its type to be based on the responses of operators rather than tourists, the report “The Economic Value Of Landscape In The Scottish Borders” concludes that “coherent management of scenic assets, cultural heritage, tourism and events programmes does not exist on the Scottish side of Carter Bar”.

Citing evidence collated from local tourism businesses of the economic value of the area’s “beautiful unspoiled scenery”, 93% of respondents expressed interest in a joint marketing initiative to raise awareness of the area’s natural assets if funding assistance were available.

According to the survey, tourism in the Teviot Valleys Special Landscape Area provides around 164 full-time equivalent jobs, a significant number in a sparsely populated rural area. It goes on to reflect strong concern at Scottish Borders Council’s consideration of three large-scale wind farms, with a minimum combined total of 35 large turbines

The report said: “Approval of any one of these would set a precedent that could turn the Teviot Valleys SLA hills into a “wind farm landscape”.

The survey, which received a high (64%) response rate from 57 local tourism businesses, finds that 76% of respondents found large-scale turbines “unhelpful” to marketing the area, with 69% saying they would be “unhelpful” in generating repeat business.

One-third (33%) of respondents had discussed wind farms with customers and reported negative views. Only one reported hearing support for wind turbines.

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