If you shut up truth and bury it under the ground, it will but grow, and gather to itself such explosive power that the day it bursts through it will blow up everything in its way.
EMILE ZOLA

Ten years too late, it’s good riddance to wind farms – one of the most dangerous delusions of our age

Christopher Booker UK

"I have been following this (wind turbine) extraordinary story for ten years ever since, in 2002, I first began looking carefully at what really lay behind this deceptive obsession with the charms of wind power. It didn’t take me long, talking to experts and reading up on the technical facts, to see that the fashionable enthusiasm for wind energy was based on a colossal illusion. I first warned about what I called ‘the greatest mistake in our history’ in an article in the Mail almost ten years ago.
I described the claim that it would be the answer to all our future energy problems as a catastrophic failure of judgment. I feared that windpower was stupendously inefficient and ludicrously expensive and that by falling for the greatest energy hoax of our time, the Labour government could be consigning Britain to a very dark future. So unreliable are wind turbines — thanks to the wind’s constant vagaries — that they are one of the most inefficient means of producing electricity ever devised."


"The erection of a wind turbine creates apprehension in the general public, which makes the property less desirable and thus diminishes the prices of neighbouring property...” “Continuing scientific uncertainty over the adverse health consequences of wind turbines only serves to perpetuate the debilitating effect of wind turbines on property prices.”
Ben Lansink, Appraiser

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By , Scottish Correspondent

01 Nov 2012

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/energy/windpower/9647674/Developer-drops-claim-wind-turbines-do-not-hit-house-prices.html

The move follows an objection from an anti–wind farm campaigner who complained about material handed out by Wind Prospect Developments Ltd at an exhibition on a proposed 12–turbine development in Midlothian, Scotland.

The leaflet, produced by the industry trade body RenewableUK, claimed that it was a “myth” that wind farms reduced the value of nearby houses.

But following the complaint from Celia Hobbs, from Penicuik, who has been fighting wind farm proposals for seven years, the ASA confirmed that Wind Prospect had provided a written assurance that it would not use the leaflet again.

She included with her complaint a newspaper article in which an estate agent said he checked for potential wind farm developments before introducing clients to new homes in the countryside.

Mrs Hobbs also quoted a ruling by the Valuation Office Agency over a wind farm at Kessingland in Suffolk, which accepted that wind turbines could reduce property values and as a result moved some homes into a lower council tax band.

Mrs Hobbs, of the Penicuik Environment Protection Association, told The Daily Telegraph: “It is plain common sense that if you could choose between two properties, one in open countryside and one next to a motorway or railway line or airport or a whirling 100 metre high machine you would choose the one in open countryside.

“I am delighted with this result from the ASA after years of trying to wake people up to the misrepresentations of the renewables industry.”

The leaflet she complained about states that “UK studies show no clear relationship between the proximity of wind farms and property prices”, and quotes a Scottish Government study claiming that “those living nearest to operating wind farms are their strongest advocates”.

Mrs Hobbs, who ran a bed and breakfast business for many years in Penicuik, said such claims were partly based on a 2007 study on the Crystal Rig wind farm in the Scottish Borders, which was carried out in the town of Dunbar, six miles from the wind farm, and a time when turbines could not be seen from the town.

A spokesman for RenewableUK said there was no conclusive evidence to show that “wind farms or wind turbines had any long–term detrimental effect on house prices”. He added that many communities benefited from wind farms through large sums of money going into the “community pot”.

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